Bob Casey Jr Committee Assignment Process

Analysis

Legislative Metrics

Read our 2017 Report Card for Casey.

Ideology–Leadership Chart

Casey is shown as a purple triangle ▲ in our ideology-leadership chart below. Each dot is a member of the Senate positioned according to our liberal–conservative ideology score (left to right) and our leadership score (leaders are toward the top).

The chart is based on the bills Casey has sponsored and cosponsored. See full analysis methodology.

Ratings from Advocacy Organizations

Committee Membership

Robert “Bob” Casey Jr. sits on the following committees:

  • Ranking Member, Senate Special Committee on Aging
  • Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry
    • Ranking Member, Subcommittee on Nutrition, Agricultural Research, and Specialty Crops
    • Member, Subcommittee on Conservation, Forestry, and Natural Resources
    • Member, Subcommittee on Livestock, Marketing, and Agriculture Security
  • Senate Committee on Finance
  • Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

Enacted Legislation

Casey was the primary sponsor of 9 bills that were enacted. The most recent include:

View All »

We consider a bill enacted if one of the following is true: a) it is enacted itself, b) it has a companion bill in the other chamber (as identified by Congress) which was enacted, or c) if about one third or more of its provisions were incorporated into bills that were enacted (as determined by an automated text analysis, applicable beginning with bills in the 110th Congress).

Bills Sponsored

Issue Areas

Casey sponsors bills primarily in these issue areas:

Health (26%)Taxation (18%)Education (14%)Labor and Employment (14%)International Affairs (9%)Crime and Law Enforcement (7%)Transportation and Public Works (6%)Agriculture and Food (6%)

Recent Bills

Some of Casey’s most recently sponsored bills include...

View All » | View Cosponsors »

Voting Record

Key Votes

Casey’s VoteVote Description
Yea H.R. 5325: Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2017
Sep 28, 2016. Bill Passed 72/26.
Nay H.R. 636: Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act of 2016
Jul 13, 2016. Motion Agreed to 89/4.
This bill became the vehicle for passage of the reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for fiscal year 2017. The bill was introduced as the America’s Small Business Tax Relief Act of 2015, and it passed the House in that form on February 13, ...
Yea H.R. 22: Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act
Dec 3, 2015. Conference Report Agreed to 83/16.
H.R 22, formerly the Hire More Heroes Act, has become the Senate’s vehicle for passage of the Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act or DRIVE Act (S. 1647). The DRIVE Act is a major bipartisan transportation bill that would authorize funding ...
Yea S. 1: Keystone XL Pipeline Approval Act
Mar 4, 2015. Veto Sustained 62/37.
On the first day of this Congress, January 3, 2015, 241 bills were introduced in the House and Senate. Legislation introduced on Day 1 is often meant to send a bold statement that “these are our top priorities” by party leadership, so the bill labeled ...
Yea S. 1: Keystone XL Pipeline Approval Act
Jan 29, 2015. Bill Passed 62/36.
On the first day of this Congress, January 3, 2015, 241 bills were introduced in the House and Senate. Legislation introduced on Day 1 is often meant to send a bold statement that “these are our top priorities” by party leadership, so the bill labeled ...
Yea H.J.Res. 124 (113th): Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2015
Sep 18, 2014. Joint Resolution Passed 78/22.
Nay H.R. 2642 (113th): Agriculture Reform, Food, and Jobs Act of 2013
Feb 4, 2014. Conference Report Agreed to 68/32.
Nay H.R. 658 (112th): FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012
Feb 6, 2012. Conference Report Agreed to 75/20.
Nay H.R. 3080 (112th): United States-Korea Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act
Oct 12, 2011. Bill Passed 83/15.
Yea H.R. 4853 (111th): Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010
Dec 15, 2010. Motion Agreed to 81/19.
The Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010 (Pub.L. 111–312, H.R. 4853, 124 Stat. 3296, enacted December 17, 2010), also known as the 2010 Tax Relief Act, was passed by the United States Congress on December 16, 2010, and signed into ...

Missed Votes

From Jan 2007 to Mar 2018, Casey missed 34 of 3,372 roll call votes, which is 1.0%. This is better than the median of 1.4% among the lifetime records of senators currently serving. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

Show the numbers...

Time PeriodVotes EligibleMissed VotesPercentPercentile
2007 Jan-Mar12600.0%0th
2007 Apr-Jun11200.0%0th
2007 Jul-Sep11900.0%0th
2007 Oct-Dec8500.0%0th
2008 Jan-Mar8500.0%0th
2008 Apr-Jun7700.0%0th
2008 Jul-Sep4700.0%0th
2008 Oct-Dec600.0%0th
2009 Jan-Mar11800.0%0th
2009 Apr-Jun9600.0%0th
2009 Jul-Sep8900.0%0th
2009 Oct-Dec9400.0%0th
2010 Jan-Mar10810.9%50th
2010 Apr-Jun9600.0%0th
2010 Jul-Sep4400.0%0th
2010 Nov-Dec5100.0%0th
2011 Jan-Mar4600.0%0th
2011 Apr-Jun5823.4%63rd
2011 Jul-Sep4912.0%48th
2011 Oct-Dec8200.0%0th
2012 Jan-Mar6300.0%0th
2012 Apr-Jun10932.8%81st
2012 Jul-Sep2813.6%61st
2012 Nov-Dec5000.0%0th
2013 Jan-Jan100.0%0th
2013 Jan-Mar9200.0%0th
2013 Apr-Jun7622.6%59th
2013 Jul-Sep4300.0%0th
2013 Oct-Dec8045.0%76th
2014 Jan-Mar9344.3%84th
2014 Apr-Jun123108.1%83rd
2014 Jul-Sep5400.0%0th
2014 Nov-Dec9600.0%0th
2015 Jan-Mar13500.0%0th
2015 Apr-Jun8511.2%46th
2015 Jul-Sep5200.0%0th
2015 Oct-Dec6700.0%0th
2016 Jan-Mar3812.6%45th
2016 Apr-Jun7933.8%76th
2016 Jul-Sep3400.0%0th
2016 Nov-Dec1200.0%0th
2017 Jan-Mar10100.0%0th
2017 Apr-Jun5400.0%0th
2017 Jul-Sep5300.0%0th
2017 Oct-Dec11700.0%0th
2018 Jan-Mar4912.0%58th

Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including:

Robert “Bob” Casey Jr. is pronounced:

RO-bert // KAY-see

The letters stand for sounds according to the following table:

LetterSounds As In
aysay
bbat
eemeet
erher
kking
otop
rrag
ssit
ttop

Capital letters indicate a stressed syllable.

Contributors 2009 - 2014

$4,534,996

grand total of contributions Bob Casey has reported in the current election cycle.
Number of Contributions (of $200 or more): 4,908

Top 20 contributors to Campaign Committee

Top:

RankContributorHires lobbyists?Lobbying firm?*Lobbyist(s) give to member?TotalIndividualsPACs
1Comcast Corp$86,675$82,175$4,500
2Reed Smith LLP$64,881$55,381$9,500
3Blank Rome LLP$48,250$43,750$4,500
4Cozen O'Connor$47,375$32,375$15,000
5UPMC Health System$46,200$46,200$0
6Blue Cross/Blue Shield$46,150$34,400$11,750
7Goldberg, Persky & White$45,150$45,150$0
7Stevens & Lee$45,150$45,150$0
9Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney$41,641$33,969$7,672
10K&L Gates$40,845$31,845$9,000
11Pride Mobility Products$39,200$30,200$9,000
12Elliott Greenleaf PC$36,624$36,624$0
13PPL Corp$36,300$21,800$14,500
14University of Pennsylvania$35,300$35,300$0
15United Food & Commercial Workers Union$34,579$34,579$0
16Bank of New York Mellon$33,050$16,050$17,000
17Pepper Hamilton LLP$32,200$21,200$11,000
18Ross Feller Casey Llp$32,100$32,100$0
19Exelon Corp$30,750$20,750$10,000
20Federated Investors Inc$29,500$26,500$3,000
20Select Medical Holdings$29,500$19,500$10,000

*registrants, or active lobbying firm

These tables list the top donors to candidates in the 2009 - 2014 election cycle. The organizations themselves did not donate, rather the money came from the organizations' PACs, their individual members or employees or owners, and those individuals' immediate families. Organization totals include subsidiaries and affiliates.

Why (and How) We Use Donors' Employer/Occupation Information

The organizations listed as "Top Contributors" reached this list for one of two reasons: either they gave through a political action committee sponsored by the organization, or individuals connected with the organization contributed directly to the candidate.

Under federal law, all contributions over $200 must be itemized and the donor's occupation and employer must be requested and disclosed, if provided. The Center uses that employer/occupation information to identify the donor's economic interest. We do this in two ways:

  • First, we apply a code to the contribution, identifying the industry. Totals for industries (and larger economic sectors) can be seen in each candidate and race profile, and in the Industry Profile section of the OpenSecrets website.
  • Second, we standardize the name of the donor's employer. If enough contributions came in from people connected with that same employer, the organization's name winds up on the Top Contributor list.

Of course, it is impossible to know either the economic interest that made each individual contribution possible or the motivation for each individual giver. However, the patterns of contributions provide critical information for voters, researchers and others. That is why Congress mandated that candidates and political parties request employer information from contributors and publicly report it when the contributor provides it.

In some cases, a cluster of contributions from the same organization may indicate a concerted effort by that organization to "bundle" contributions to the candidate. In other cases—both with private companies and with government agencies, non-profits and educational institutions—the reason for the contributions may be completely unrelated to the organization.

Showing these clusters of contributions from people associated with particular organizations provides a valuable—and unique—way of understanding where a candidate is getting his or her financial support. Knowing those groups is also useful after the election, as issues come before Congress and the administration that may affect those organizations and their industries.

METHODOLOGY

The figures profiled here include money from two sources: These contributors were either the sponsors of a PAC that gave to the politician, or they were listed as an individual donor's employer. Donors who give more than $200 to any federal candidate, PAC or party committee must list their occupation and employer. Based on that information, the donor is given an economic code. These totals are conservative, as not all of the individual contributions have yet been classified by the Center.

In cases where two or more people from the same family contributed, the income-earner's occupation/employer is assigned to all non-wage earning family members. If, for instance, Henry Jones lists his employer as First National Bank, his wife Matilda lists "Homemaker" and 12-year old Tammy shows up as "Student," the Center would identify all their contributions as being related to the "First National Bank" since that's the source of the family's income.

Although individual contributions are generally categorized based on the donor's occupation/employer, in some cases individuals may be classified instead as ideological donors. A contribution to a candidate may be given an ideological code, rather than an economic code, if the contributor gives to an ideological political action committee AND the candidate has received money from PACs representing that same ideological interest.

NOTE: All the numbers on this page are for the 2009 - 2014 election cycle and based on Federal Election Commission data released electronically on February 27, 2017. ("Help! The numbers don't add up...")

WHY DON'T THE NUMBERS ADD UP?

Sometimes it's hard to make apple-to-apple comparisons across some of the pages in a candidate's profile. Here's why:

Summary numbers - specifically "Total Raised and Spent" and "PAC/Individual Split" - are based on summary reports filed by the candidates with the Federal Election Commission. All other numbers in these profiles ("Quality of Disclosure," "Geography" and "Special Interests") are derived from detailed FEC reports that itemize all contributions of $200 or more.

There is also a time lag in posting the information. While summary numbers are reported almost immediately by the FEC -- and listed quickly on OpenSecrets -- processing and analyzing the detailed records takes much longer. For that reason, summary numbers are usually higher (and more current) than the numbers based on detailed records.

HOW CURRENT ARE THESE FIGURES?

The figures in these profiles are taken from databases uploaded by the FEC to the internet on the first day of every month. Those databases are only as current as the FEC has been able to compile by that date (see the note above about lag times for data entry).

The Center updates figures for "Total Raised and Spent" and for "PAC/Individual Split" a few days after the first of the month. The remaining figures - based on detailed contribution data - is updated by the Center after the 20th of every month. This gives us time to analyze the contributions and categorize them by industry and interest group.

Feel free to distribute or cite this material, but please credit the Center for Responsive Politics. For permission to reprint for commercial uses, such as textbooks, contact the Center: info[at]crp.org

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