Africana Womanism Essay Format

The purpose of this research project has been to shed light on the experiences of Black women in Afrocentric groupsâ Nation of Gods and Earths, the Black Panther Party, and Rastafariansâ that operated on the fringes of society during the 1960s through the early 2000s. This work articulates the gender dynamics between the men and women of the groups. In it, I trace the history of Black nationalism and identity in the United States in the late 19th century to the 20th century which set the framework for the formation of the Nation of Gods and Earths (NGE), the Black Panther Party(BPP), and Rastafarianism and its members to see themselves as a part of the Black nation or community and the women of these groups to see their identity tied in with the goals and desires of the group not as one set on individualistic ambitions.

The Africana womanist did not see herself as an individual but rather a vital part of the entire Black community. From a feminist perspective, it would appear as though the women of these Afrocentric fringe groups were marginalized and oppressed by the men but this perspective fails to give credence to the fact that Rasta women, Earthsâ the female members of the NGEâ and women Panthers saw race and racism as a more pressing issue than that of sexism. That is not to say that women in these groups did not question or challenge some of the sexist actions of their male counterparts. When there was a challenge it was done so in a way that reminded the men of the tenets of their respective group and their responsibility to uphold those principles; principles that required the men to consider the women as equally valuable in the cause of the group and deserving of just treatment.

While adhering to a gender order that afforded the male members a more visible position, the women of this study did not view their positions as mothers, wives, and sister members as a hindrance to their own personal joy or freedom. In fact, using an Africana womanist point of view, they would argue that it was in the best interest of the entire Rasta, NGE, or BPP and by extension, the Black community for them to own their statuses as a form of empowerment. For it was through their wombs and nurturing that the next generation would be born, through their providing a stable home that would allow their husbands to focus their attentions on the issues concerning their communities outward and through their role as supportive â sistersâ encouraging the men that the community could advance socially.

Citation

Clenora Hudson-Weems, Africana Womanism and the Diaspora in the 21st Century

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Abstract:

ABSTRACT

Clenora Hudson-Weems, Africana Womanism and the Diaspora in the 21st Century

Several books and essays comprise Hudson-Weems work dealing with genuine sisterhood on the continent and abroad in the United States, Africana Womanism: Reclaiming Ourselves, Africana Womanist Literary Theory, Africana Womanism and the Critical Need for Africana Theory and Thought, "Africana Womanism: Entering the New Millennium and "Africana Womanism, Black Feminism, African Feminism, and Womanism." These books and essays outline Hudson-Weems’s critical Africana womanist philosophy on Africana women on matters for empowerment and agency. They focus specifically on providing a paradigm for Black women to use in literary works and intellectual productions. The purpose of this paper will be to make an Afrocentric critical examination of the aforementioned books and essays along with an interview of where she sees this paradigm since its inception in the 1980’s unfolding and continuing to build in the 21st century for women in the United States and abroad.
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Association:
Name:36th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:

MLA Citation:

Hubbard, LaRese."Clenora Hudson-Weems, Africana Womanism and the Diaspora in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012<Not Available>. 2014-11-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561778_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hubbard, L. N., 2012-03-07"Clenora Hudson-Weems, Africana Womanism and the Diaspora in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA<Not Available>. 2014-11-24 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561778_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ABSTRACT

Clenora Hudson-Weems, Africana Womanism and the Diaspora in the 21st Century

Several books and essays comprise Hudson-Weems work dealing with genuine sisterhood on the continent and abroad in the United States, Africana Womanism: Reclaiming Ourselves, Africana Womanist Literary Theory, Africana Womanism and the Critical Need for Africana Theory and Thought, "Africana Womanism: Entering the New Millennium and "Africana Womanism, Black Feminism, African Feminism, and Womanism." These books and essays outline Hudson-Weems’s critical Africana womanist philosophy on Africana women on matters for empowerment and agency. They focus specifically on providing a paradigm for Black women to use in literary works and intellectual productions. The purpose of this paper will be to make an Afrocentric critical examination of the aforementioned books and essays along with an interview of where she sees this paradigm since its inception in the 1980’s unfolding and continuing to build in the 21st century for women in the United States and abroad.


Similar Titles:
The Role of History in Africana Studies in the 21st Century

Open Secrets: A Poor Black Woman's Journey to the 21st Century

Africa and it's Diaspora: Renaissance, Reconnection, and Reconsideration of Citizenship in the 21st Century

A Proposal for Teaching the Africana Experience in the Context of 21st Century Africana Studies

Confessions of an Angry Woman: From Hopelessness to Activism in the 21st Century


 
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